Courses

Fall 2022

Honors Classes for Freshmen

HON 1091 sec H02 Honors Forum II

Graduate Studies, a Primer

T 5:00 p.m. – 5:50 p.m.

Studies show that 70-80 % of college students will change their majors at least once, and some numerous times. While this may be considered normal undergraduate behavior, it adds time and financial obligations to the student’s college career in having to adjust course requirements to meet the pre-requisites for different majors.

This class is an examination of the educational system we have in the United States of America. Upon completion of the course, students will have a thorough understanding of the different components upon which students are trained from primary school up through Post-doctoral training in our country. They will learn about different international educational system models and opportunities to study abroad, and have knowledge of the resources available in making educational and career decisions.

Taught by Dr. Hart Bailey, Professor in the Department of Pathobiology and Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine

 

HON 1091 sect H03 Honors Forum II

Viva Latinoamerica! An uncensored guide to the world most vibrant culture

T 3:00 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.

As the majority of Americans, you know about tacos, margaritas, and churros. You can also identify Sammy Sosa or Jennifer López as you watch some of the American TV shows, and by social media, you might be familiar to very distinctive rhythms as tango, merengue, and salsa. As a member of the world community, you have witnessed the phenomenon of globalization and the opportunities it offers. In this course we are embarking in an adventure to learn about the different cultures that form this continent we call America. We will “virtually” sail in the Caribbean as we learn about the cultural heritage of the Islands; visit the city of Antigua in Guatemala as we explore the Mayan culture; hike the Inca Trail Trek and amaze as we discover Machu Picchu and the richness of the Inca Empire; Finally, we will make a stop in Argentina for the last leg of “our trip”. Then, it is time for you to make your own itinerary. Do you want to go on a research trip to Costa Rica’s rain forest? Be a Pirate in Old San Juan? Marvel at the engineering knowledge needed it in construction of the Itaipu Water Dam? Or, just stroll around Mexico beautiful colonial cities? . . . You will have time for a “discovery trip” of your own.

Taught by Dr. Rosa Vozzo, Instructor in the Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures

 

HON 1091 sec H04 Honors Forum II

Meat Chemistry & Cuisine a First Year Experience

M 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Cooking meat is as much an exercise in chemical reactions as it is in culinary flare. The Chemistry and Cuisine course will teach the principles of Muscle Composition

and Meat Chemistry and demonstrate their impact on final product quality. In each meeting we will introduce specific concepts related to meat chemistry and students will be exposed to a range of culinary methods that manipulate the physiochemical composition of the meat product to yield a final dish. This dynamic and engaging learning environment will increase students’ understanding of the mediums and mechanisms that convert muscle to meat and meat to masterpieces.

Taught by Dr. Derris Devost-Burnett, Associate Professor in the Department of Animal and Dairy Sciences

 

HON 1091 sec H05 Honors Forum II

Extreme Medicine: Understanding Unusual Cases on House, M.D.

M 11:00 a.m. – 11:50 p.m.

House, M.D. is a popular television show in which many strange and bizarre medical cases are presented. Questions often arise about the validity and probability of the illnesses and diseases presented on the show. This class will examine some of the medical cases presented on the show, discuss the probability and validity of each case, and examine how the doctors were able to reach the correct diagnosis

Taught by Adam Knight, Professor in the Department of Kinesiology

 

HON 1091 sec H06 Honors Forum II

Game Changing: Exploring the African American Student Experience at MSU

T 10:00 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.

Integration at Mississippi State looked very different from integration at other state schools in the Deep South. Today, Mississippi State has the highest population of African American students of all Southeastern Conference schools. Using documents and primary source material from University Archives along with guest speakers, this course will explore the African American student experience at MSU beginning with integration and highlighting important milestones up to today. Through their research, students create a capstone project (examples: oral history, timeline, web site, physical Library exhibit) that documents a part of African American history at MSU.

Taught by Jessica Perkins-Smith, University Archivist, Mitchell Memorial Library

 

HON 1091 sec H07 Honors Forum II

Heroes and Tricksters: Germanic Tales and Modern Media

F 10:00 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.

Students in this course will be exposed to the Germanic tradition of Norse mythology and will learn through original source text and scholarly literature about hero and trickster archetypes. Students will read German texts in translation, like those from the Brothers Grimm, to practice identifying hero and trickster characters. The goal for the students is that they can reflect on these texts and apply them both critically and creatively to our modern media. Once the students’ background in heroes and tricksters has been established, the course will move into modern media, including movies and TV series. This seminar will aim to show students how they can be more critical and more cognizant consumers of their favorite entertainment media while flexing their creativity to find new perspectives.

Taught by Arianne Hainsey, Lecturer in the Department of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures

 

HON 1091 sec H08 Honors Forum II

Need for Speed: The Science of Motorsport Racing

W 11:00 a.m. – 11:50 p.m.

This seminar focuses on the science behind high speed, high precision, high adrenaline and high-risk motorsport racing across several disciplines ranging from Formula 1, IndyCar, NASCAR, World Rally and Rally Cross, Endurance Racing, MotoGP, including the latest Formula E and E-Racing championships. This class will explore the impact of motorsports on anatomical, physiological, biomechanical, psychological, and cognitive factors in human performance, as well as on safety and training factors associated with motorsport racing.

Taught by Dr. Harish Chander, Associate Professor in the Department of Kinesiology

 

HON 1081 Honors Forum I

Introduction to Honors Education

sec H01: T 11:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.

sec H02: TH 11:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.

This course is designed to help freshmen Honors College students learn more about themselves, the university, and the specific opportunities available through the Shackouls Honors College. It is appropriate for every SHC major and interest level. Students will enjoy dynamic class conversations and interactions. They will explore their personality type to learn how they learn best while maximizing their productive interactions with others. There will be regular visits from esteemed university representatives, introductions to research tools, and opportunities to expand their circle of colleagues and friends for an overall more productive and successful student experience at Mississippi State University’s Shackouls Honors College.

Taught by Dr. Angela Farmer, Assistant Clinical Professor, Shackouls Honors College

 

HON 2091, sec H01 Honors Forum IV

National Fellowships

TH 10:00 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.

What is a national fellowship? Why should I care? I want to be a doctor, so the Rhodes Scholarship is not for me? There is no way I can win a national fellowship like the Gates Cambridge. I’m too busy to write yet another personal statement for a fellowship. All those fellowships go to Ivy League kids. They won’t respect MSU and Mississsippi, so why bother? My advisor thinks I should just go on to graduate school. I’m a STEM student and all of those fellowships go to English or history majors.

In my seven years of mentoring students for nationally competitive scholarships and fellowships, I have heard some version of just about all of these statements or questions. The purpose of this seminar is to enable students to get beyond these false, self-limiting assumptions about national fellowships. In this seminar, students will learn about many of the most prominent fellowships for undergraduates who want to pursue graduate school, who want to explore the world, who want to master a second language or who want to be a change agent in their community, region, and nation. Students will learn the requirements of these fellowships and begin to develop the necessary skills to apply. My hope is that each student who participates in this fellowship seminar begins to view the process of applying for fellowships such as the Rhodes, Truman, Fulbright, or the Goldwater as a challenge that can amplify the college experience and make them better applicants for graduate school, professional school, or job candidates.

Taught by Dr. David Hoffman, Director of the Office of Prestigious External Scholarships, Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Middle Eastern Cultures

 

HON 2091, Sec H03, Honors Forum IV

20th Century Populism

T 12:30 p.m. – 1:20 p.m.

This course will explore American Populism in the 20th century from the perspective of one of the most controversial politicians in American history, former governor and U.S. Senator Huey P. Long of Louisiana. Populism is a political approach that attempts to appeal to ordinary people who feel that their concerns are disregarded by elites. No politician appealed to the populist ideal more so than Governor Long; his unsophisticated manner and sympathy for the underprivileged successfully diverted attention away from his brutal autocratic methods. Although Governor Long is often labeled as one of the most corrupt politicians in American history, his popularity was unparalleled. This course will examine the popular social programs proposed and

implemented under Long’s leadership, as well as how many of his good deeds were ultimately overshadowed by the unprecedented executive power that he accumulated (by any means necessary) to ensure that he maintained control.

Taught by Brian Pugh, Ph.D, Executive Director, Stennis Center for Public Service

 

 

Honors Classes for Upper Classmen

HON 3183 sec H01 Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar in Humanities

The World of King Arthur

MW 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

This interdisciplinary Humanities seminar explores the origins of the Arthurian myth in history, archaeology, and folklore; its manifestation in art and literature from the Middle Ages to the present; and depictions of King Arthur, Guinevere, Merlin et al. in film and television.

Taught by Dr. Christopher Snyder, Faculty Fellow and Professor of History and Director of British Studies, Shackouls Honors College

 

HON 3183, sect H02 Interdisciplinary Humanities Seminar

Science Fiction, 1960 to the Present: Conquering the World?

TTH 3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

The subject of this course will be the history and development of science fiction over the last six decades, a period which has seen the genre gain greater worldwide popularity than ever before in its history. We will read and discuss a wide and varied selection of novels and short stories from the USA and elsewhere, including internationally famous classics such as Frank Herbert's Dune and books by Philip K. Dick, Ursula K. Le Guin and Margaret Atwood - but also many slightly lesser-known works that are well worth discovering! A study of science fiction as a global phenomenon, though, would not be complete without also covering comic strips/graphic novels, TV shows, computer games and - not least - movies, ranging from the Star Wars franchise to the dystopian vision of Terry Gilliam's Brazil. Among many other topics, we will look at the evolution of Marvel science fiction superheroes from the Silver Age comics of the 1960s to the massively successful Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Taught by Dr. Matthew Peaple, Visiting Assistant Professor, Shackouls Honors College

 

HON 3173-H01: Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar in Fine Arts

Myths, Legends, and Stories: Discovering the Ancient World through Films, Plays, and Musicals

TTH 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

This seminar course is designed for students to read selected Greek and Roman plays and literary works, to watch representative films based on ancient myths, legends, and stories, and to create active research in the discovery of how the Greek and Roman civilizations have made, and will continue to make, an enduring impact on contemporary society. Through class discussions, readings, presentations, films, and papers, students will reach a greater understanding of the significance in the social, cultural, political, and philosophical influences of the ancient world. Tales of adventure, power, war, revenge, lust, jealously, and love continue to play huge roles in how we live our lives as a society today and what we continue to enjoy as entertainment.

Taught by Dr. Donna Clevinger, Senior Faculty Fellow and Professor, Shackouls Honors College

 

HON 3163, sec. H01: Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar in Natural Sciences

Introduction to Neuroscience

MWF 11:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.

This course is a textbook-based, lecture- and discussion-format introduction to basic neuroscience for honors students. Topics include basic mechanisms of neural conductance and transmission; intracellular signaling pathways and neuronal plasticity; basics of sensory neuroscience focusing on somatosensatisicon and vision; rudiments of motor neuroscience; introduction to cognitive and systems neuroscience; neurology and neuropsychology. No previous background in neuroscience will be assumed; university-level first-year biology and chemistry, interest in science helpful.

Taught by Dr. John Bickle, Professor of Philosophy, Affiliate Faculty in the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomical Sciences

 

HON 3143, sec H01, Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar in Social Science

Non-Profit Organizations in Society

MW 5:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.

This course will investigate how governments are relinquishing some of their duties to non-profit organizations and individuals/groups in society. This course will specifically look at non-profit strategy and governance to better explain how organizations are used to deal with society’s social ills. Additionally, this course will help provide students with an opportunity to learn and apply skills needed to lead and govern an existing non-profit organization or how to start their own non-profit. Students will learn how to apply for 501(c)(3) status, craft mission statements, best recruit board members, structure committees, and how to effectively run meetings to ensure oversight and effective leadership. Lastly, students will have the opportunity to meet with executive directors of multiple non-profit organizations to discuss the pros and cons of leading and governing their non-profit organizations.

Taught by Brian Pugh, Ph.D, Executive Director, Stennis Center for Public Service

 

HON 2990 Special Topics in Honors

Who’s the Monster? Ethical Explorations of Jurassic Park

TTH 8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

This course is designed to analyze works of fiction for its greater applications into today’s world of scientific exploration and progress. The work and its interplay into modifying the genome offers an ideal segue into the phenomenon known as CRISPR which allows for gene editing in the name of eugenics. All novels in Michael Crichton’s “Jurassic Park” series in conjunction with Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” will be analyzed and compared against each other as well as current and projected technologies, protocols, and ethical considerations.

The hypothetical monsters of an author’s imagination may well become accepted “cutting edge” science in the 21st century. This course helps students better understand the ranges and expectations of man’s quest for knowledge and immortality...answering the age-old question of “Who’s the monster now?”

Taught by Dr. Angela Farmer, Assistant Clinical Professor, Shackouls Honors College

 

 

One Credit Classes

 

HON 2081, sec H01 Honors Forum III

Leadership

M 4:00 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.

*Description and/or permission

Taught by Dr. Mark Keenum, President of Mississippi State University

 

HON 2091, sec H01 Honors Forum IV

National Fellowships

TH 10:00 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.

What is a national fellowship? Why should I care? I want to be a doctor, so the Rhodes Scholarship is not for me? There is no way I can win a national fellowship like the Gates Cambridge. I’m too busy to write yet another personal statement for a fellowship. All those fellowships go to Ivy League kids. They won’t respect MSU and Mississsippi, so why bother? My advisor thinks I should just go on to graduate school. I’m a STEM student and all of those fellowships go to English or history majors.

In my seven years of mentoring students for nationally competitive scholarships and fellowships, I have heard some version of just about all of these statements or questions. The purpose of this seminar is to enable students to get beyond these false, self-limiting assumptions about national fellowships. In this seminar, students will learn about many of the most prominent fellowships for undergraduates who want to pursue graduate school, who want to explore the world, who want to master a second language or who want to be a change agent in their community, region, and nation. Students will learn the requirements of these fellowships and begin to develop the necessary skills to apply. My hope is that each student who participates in this fellowship seminar begins to view the process of applying for fellowships such as the Rhodes, Truman, Fulbright, or the Goldwater as a challenge that can amplify the college experience and make them better applicants for graduate school, professional school, or job candidates.

 

*For Sophomore and Juniors

Taught by Dr. David Hoffman, Director of the Office of Prestigious External Scholarships, Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Middle Eastern Cultures

 

HON 2091, Sec H03, Honors Forum IV

20th Century Populism

T 12:30 p.m. – 1:20 p.m.

This course will explore American Populism in the 20th century from the perspective of one of the most controversial politicians in American history, former governor and U.S. Senator Huey P. Long of Louisiana. Populism is a political approach that attempts to appeal to ordinary people who feel that their concerns are disregarded by elites. No politician appealed to the populist ideal more so than Governor Long; his unsophisticated manner and sympathy for the underprivileged successfully diverted attention away from his brutal autocratic methods. Although Governor Long is often labeled as one of the most corrupt politicians in American history, his popularity was unparalleled. This course will examine the popular social programs proposed and

implemented under Long’s leadership, as well as how many of his good deeds were ultimately overshadowed by the unprecedented executive power that he accumulated (by any means necessary) to ensure that he maintained control.

 

Taught by Brian Pugh, Ph.D, Executive Director, Stennis Center for Public Service

 

*For Sophomore, Juniors, & Seniors

Quest Courses

 

Our “Quest” courses are small discussion-based seminars (about 15 students) focused on Great Books, Big Questions, and Big Ideas. Students will read some of the most important texts from the history of literature, philosophy, political science, art, architecture, and music from around the world. Discussions will address questions such as: What is human nature? What is the nature of the divine? What is justice? What is truth? What is love? What is the purpose of art? and How do we know what we know?

Students who complete Quest 1 and Quest 2 and earn a grade of C or higher will receive the following General Educations credits:

3 Humanities credits
3 Social Sciences credits
“S” credit for Fine Arts. (Please note: Any additional 3-credit course must be completed in order to meet total degree hours for your major.)
HON 1163:  The Quest Begins (3 credits)

This course examines core texts from Classical Antiquity through the Renaissance. In addition to several short interpretive papers, students will be expected to produce a substantial comparative essay.

HON 1173: The West and the Wider World (3 credits)

This course will examines core texts from the Renaissance to the present. In addition to short interpretive papers, students will be expected to produce a research paper and present their research to the class.

 

HON 1163 H01 Quest 1, The Quest Begins

MW 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Taught by Dr. Christian Flow, Assistant Professor in the Department of History

HON 1163 H02 Quest 1, The Quest Begins

MW 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Taught by Dr. Christian Flow, Assistant Professor in the Department of History

HON 1163 H03 Quest 1, The Quest Begins

MW 3:30 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.

Taught by Dr. Christopher Snyder, Professor of History and Director of British Studies, Shackouls Honors College

HON 1163 H04 Quest 1, The Quest Begins

TTH 9:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Taught by Dr. Matthew Peaple, Visiting Assistant Professor, Shackouls Honors College

HON 1163 H05 Quest 1, The Quest Begins

TTH 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Taught by Dr. Matthew Peaple, Visiting Assistant Professor, Shackouls Honors College              

HON 1173 H02 Quest 2, The West and the Wider World

MW 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Taught by Dr. Eric Vivier, Associate Professor of English, Shackouls Honors College

HON 1173 H01 Quest 2, The West and the Wider World

TTH 9:30 a.m. – 10:45 p.m.

Taught by Dr. Kristin Boyce, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Shackouls Honors College

HON 1173 H03 Quest 2, The West and the Wider World

TTH 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Taught by Dr. Kristin Boyce, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Shackouls Honors College

HON 1173 H04, Quest 2, The West and the Wider World

TTH 3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Taught by Dr. Anthony Neal, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Shackouls Honors College


OTHER CLASSES

CO 1503-H01: Introduction to Theatre

TTH 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

A comprehensive view of the theatre, including plays, playwrights, directing, acting, theatres, and technicians.

Taught by Dr. Donna Clevinger, Senior Faculty Fellow and Professor, Shackouls Honors College