Courses

Spring 2023

One-Credit Classes

HON 2081-H01: Honors Forum III
Women in Leadership
W 1:00 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.

In “Honors Women’s Leadership” we will explore Lean In for Graduates by Sheryl Sandberg to better understand many of the challenges as well as opportunities available to women.  Topics that will be discussed include stereotype analysis, under-representation of women in executive leadership, alternative presentation of women in leadership, as well as the multi-faceted societal role that women play when they aspire to lead. We will also enjoy scheduled visits from impactful women leaders across campus as well as within our community and throughout the United States. There has never been a better or more important time to Lean In.

Taught by Dr. Angela Farmer, Assistant Clinical Professor, Shackouls Honors College

 

HON 2081-H02: Honors Forum III

Interning on Capitol Hill

M 4:00 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.

Have you recently considered applying for an internship or fellowship on Capitol Hill? If so, this course is for you. This course will provide students with specific information on how to apply for internships on the Hill and how to be successful once there. This course will also give students the opportunity to engage with congressional staffers working in personal offices, on committees, and other congressional agencies (such as the Library of Congress and the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center). Students will hear from the chiefs of staffs for Mississippi’s congressional delegation, as well as personal and professional staffers from multiple states. Additionally, students will be able to build their professional network and improve confidence as they interact with congressional staffers on all levels, from interns to policy directors and chiefs of staff.

Taught by Dr. Brian Pugh, Executive Director, Stennis Center for Public Service

 

Honors Interdisciplinary Seminars

HON 3143-H01: Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar in the Social Sciences:

Harry Potter & Society         

F 9:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.

This course will examine how the Harry Potter franchise influences and is influenced by society.  Specifically, the course will focus on social identities, social inequalities, social institutions, and social change through the Harry Potter universe (books, movies, fandom, culture).  Previous knowledge of the Harry Potter storyline is required to get the most out of this course.

Taught by Dr. Nicole Rader, Professor and Department Head, Sociology


HON 3173-H01: Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar in Fine Arts

From Page to Stage

TTH 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

What does it take to produce a play for public performance? For this course, it takes a script, an actor, a director, a place and, of course, someone to watch. Each of these areas, and more, will be explored with the ultimate goal of presenting a 10-minute play for public performance.

Taught by Dr. Donna Clevinger, Senior Faculty Fellow and Professor, Shackouls Honors College


HON 3183-H01: Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar in the Humanities

The Place of Love in Philosophy and the Arts

MW 2-3:15    

What's love got to do with it? From ancient times to the present, some of our greatest philosophical and artistic achievements probe the question of what love is and what role it plays in a flourishing human life.  The course will explore these basic questions by putting philosophers such as Plato, Nietzsche, and Iris Murdoch into conversation with novels, movies and theatrical performances. The second half of the course will be organized around The Bard and the Dark Lady, a collaboration between Nashville Ballet, poet Caroline Randall Williams, and Rhiannon Giddens (of the Carolina Chocolate Drops) which imaginatively explores the real historical possibility that the "dark lady" to whom Shakespeare addresses his Love Sonnets was a brothel owner of African descent.

Taught by Dr. Kristin Boyce, Associate Professor of Philosophy, and Shackouls Honors Faculty Fellow


HON 3183-H02: Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar in the Humanities

Mythocatastrophe: Myth and Fantasy in an Age of Disenchantment

T 3:00 p.m. – 5:50 p.m.

This seminar will explore writers and filmmakers who have embraced older, mythic/fantastical forms of storytelling against prevailing trends like realism and scientism.  We will read early pioneers of fantasy like William Morris, George MacDonald, J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, T.H. White, and Ursula K. Le Guin as well as examples of postmodern myth and magical realism (in writers like Umberto Ecco, Gabriel García Márquez, Isabel Allende, Jorge Luis Borges, Salmon Rushdie, Toni Morrison, Neil Gaiman, and Haruki Murakami).  We will also critique film adaptations (of Tolkien, Gaiman, etc.) and filmmakers known for magical realism (Wim Wenders, Guillermo Del Toro).

Taught by Dr. Christopher Snyder, Faculty Fellow and Professor of History and Director of British Studies, Shackouls Honors College


HON 3163- H01: Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar in Natural Sciences

Chernobyl: From Here to Eternity

TTH 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

This course is designed to unpack the biggest environmental impact of the 20th century, Chernobyl. The course will analyze Kate Brown’s “Manual for Survival: A Chernobyl Guide to the Future,” “Midnight in Chernobyl” by Adam Higginbotham, and “Voices from Chernobyl,” by Svetlana Alexichvich. In addition, we will reflect, in brief, on the HBO/SKY mini-series “Chernobyl: The Final Warning” as well as the Netflix documentary, “Mytomb.” With live interviews with one of the most knowledgeable Nuclear Physicists in the United States and former Director of the United States Enrichment Corporation, we will also unpack the differences between Soviet reactors and those found in the United States to better appreciate how establishing “safe” reactors begins from design and construction and continues throughout daily operational protocols. In this course students will come to realize that truth can truly be more terrifying than fiction.

Taught by Dr. Angela Farmer, Assistant Clinical Professor, Shackouls Honors College

 

 

Quest Courses

 

Our “Quest” courses are small discussion-based seminars (about 15 students) focused on Great Books, Big Questions, and Big Ideas. Students will read some of the most important texts from the history of literature, philosophy, political science, art, architecture, and music from around the world. Discussions will address questions such as: What is human nature? What is the nature of the divine? What is justice? What is truth? What is love? What is the purpose of art? and How do we know what we know?

Students who complete Quest 1 and Quest 2 and earn a grade of C or higher will receive the following General Educations credits:

3 Humanities credits (Quest 1)
3 Social Sciences credits (Quest 2)
“S” credit for Fine Arts. (Please note: Any additional 3-credit course must be completed in order to meet total degree hours for your major.)

Quest Courses

 

 

HON 1163:  The Quest Begins (3 credits). This course examines core texts from Classical Antiquity through the Renaissance. In addition to several short interpretive papers, students will be expected to produce a substantial comparative essay.

HON 1163-H01: Quest 1, The Quest Begins

MW 3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Taught by Dr. Christian Flow, Assistant Professor of History and Shackouls Honors Faculty Fellow

 

HON 1163-H02: Quest 1, The Quest Begins

MW 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Taught by Dr. Brian Davisson, Associate Professor of Classical and Modern Languages and Literatures

 

HON 1163-H03: Quest 1, The Quest Begins

TTH 9:30 a.m. – 10:45 p.m.

Taught by Dr. Matthew Peaple, Visiting Assistant Professor, Shackouls Honors College

 

HON 1163-H04: Quest 1, The Quest Begins

TTH 3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Taught by Dr. Matthew Peaple, Visiting Assistant Professor, Shackouls Honors College

                                                                                                                                                          

HON 1173: The West and the Wider World (3 credits). This course will examines core texts from the Renaissance to the present. In addition to short interpretive papers, students will be expected to produce a research paper and present their research to the class.

HON 1173-H01: Quest 2, The West and the Wider World

TTH 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Taught by Dr. Matthew Peaple, Visiting Assistant Professor, Shackouls Honors College

 

HON 1173-H02: Quest 2, The West and the Wider World

MW 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Taught by Dr. Eric Vivier, Associate Professor of English and Shackouls Honors Faculty Fellow

 

HON 1173-H03: Quest 2, The West and the Wider World

T 2:00 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.

Taught by Dr. Donna Clevinger, Senior Faculty Fellow and Professor, Shackouls Honors College

 

HON 1173-H05: Quest 2, The West and the Wider World

TH 2:00 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.

Taught by Dr. Donna Clevinger, Senior Faculty Fellow and Professor, Shackouls Honors College

 

HON 1173-H04: Quest 2, The West and the Wider World

TTH 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Taught by Dr. Christopher Snyder, Professor of History and Director of British Studies, Shackouls Honors College